I have a few SBDU frames in the queue waiting for a rebuild. Time is just conspiring against me – It is the one factor that I lack at the moment. I sometimes manage to squeeze 30 minutes every now and again to bolt a few pieces together; it’s so frustrating having the frames and having the parts but not having the time. Even time for blogging is at a premium at the moment and most or my posts are written late at night with my eyes squinting at the bright screen. 

I had intended to do a comprehensive rebuild blog on this TI-Raleigh bike but I’ve had second thoughts. Instead, I’ve decided to use SB6398, a 753R frame with a Super Record 50th Anniversary group for a detailed post; it is sitting in the workshop waiting to go back together. That means SB3800 will just be an overview, split into 2 posts, but hopefully still interesting.

SB3800 is in very good condition, it has a few grubby spots and some paint chips but nothing that requires major surgery. I’d rate the paint finish at good to very good. A little cleaning and polishing, followed by some Kurust and paint touch up make the red colour shine! While I’m at it, some new titanium bolts help to finish the frame before I start fitting parts.

SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 New Hardware
SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 New Hardware

First things first… I build in a certain order. I start with the headset and then the BB. Once the BB is fitted, I can attach the chainset and pedals. When the chainset is attached, the front derailleur can go on together with the rear derailleur. Gear levers and brake calipers are next followed by bars and stem and brake levers – that just leaves wheels, chain and cables.

SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 Headset and BB
SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 Headset and BB

Lots of people have lots of ideas about what grease to use for different areas of a bike. I have two!

If it moves it gets multipurpose grease… if it doesn’t move it gets copper grease. The multipurpose grease is the stuff I use on something like car wheel bearings. My thinking is that if it can survive the heat and speed of a car wheel bearing, together with every type of outdoor conditions, rain, water, snow and mud, then it can handle some bicycle ball bearings without any problems. The copper grease is an anti seize compound. I use this on every thread and static item such as seat pins and stems. Those two are all you need.

SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 Headset Fitting
SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 Headset Fitting

Facing tools are expensive so I only use them when I need to. This frame isn’t a new respray, if it was, I would have faced the head tube and BB shell. But this frame is good, the faces are smooth and free from paint and other blemishes. The headset and BB were smooth when I took them out so there is no reason they won’t be when I refit them.

Before fitting the forks, I removed the nice but incorrect Reynolds 753 fork blade transfers and replaced them with period correct circular TI transfers. They look much better and are correct for a 1980 TI frame.

SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 New Fork Blade Transfers
SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 New Fork Blade Transfers

Bottom bracket, chainset, gear levers and bars/stem/brake levers all quickly follow.

SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 First Parts
SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 First Parts

This bike didn’t come with any pedals and when I took it apart, I was left with the decision to go with clips and straps or go clipless. Well, I decided to go with traditional clips and straps. I had some nice chrome Sturmey Archer toe clips and some new Alfredo Binda toe straps that were spare from SB4059 and managed to acquire some gorgeous Suntour Superbe pedals – these fit in perfectly with the rest of the Suntour spec.

SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 Suntour Superbe Pedals
SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 Suntour Superbe Pedals
SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 Suntour Superbe Pedals Fitted
SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 Suntour Superbe Pedals Fitted

Last thing to do today was measure up for spokes and lace the wheels. I have the Campagnolo Record hubs that came with the bike and some H PLUS SON TB14 rims. The website for these rims does give the ERD but it is always wise to double check. ERD is the Effective Rim Diameter – google it for a full explanation… It is one of the measurements needed for calculating spoke length.

I use the 2 x 200mm spoke method. Cut two old spokes down to 200mm and set the spoke nipples to the end of the thread. Place these spokes in opposite rim holes and measure the gap between the spoke ends. Your ERD is 200+200+(gap).

SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 Spoke Calculator
SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 Spoke Calculator

The gap between the spoke ends was 210mm which makes the ERD for these rims 610mm (200+200+210). This is exactly what H PLUS SON quote on their rim specification. Measure the hubs and add all the measurements into spocalc (an Excel spreadsheet to calculate spoke length). For 32 hole rims using a 3 cross lacing pattern, Spocalc has told me to use 296/299mm on the rear and 299mm on the front.

I’ve used DT Swiss double butted stainless spokes and the wheels are laced and ready to tension and true.

SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 Wheels Laced
SB3800 SBDU Ilkeston 1980 TI-Raleigh Team Pro 753 Wheels Laced

That is all for part one…

Part two will be the final assembly. Rim tapes, tyres and tubes for the wheels and fitting the freewheel and chain. Inner and outer brake an gear cables will be cut and fitted and the final saddle height and stem setup will be done before fitting the white Benotto bar tape.

I’m really pleased with how this build is going so far. The frame is looking amazing and the parts look great against the gleaming TI-Raleigh paint.

Now all I need is just a little more time…

Advertisements

About the Author Neil McGowran

Blogger of all things to do with the Specialist Bicycle Development Unit (SBDU) and TI-Raleigh Ilkeston.

2 comments

  1. Hi Neil,

    A fascinating blog! I found your site whilst surfing for Raleigh Lightweight info. I am currently restoring a 1989 Raleigh Type 8904 531 Race, built in October 1988. A product of the Lightweight Unit (Nottingham) frame no. WN8000689. It came to me in a terrible state, but is just about salvedgeable! It will be built up with an age appropriate Campy Chorus groupset and Cinelli bars and stem. Anyway, you mention only using two types of grease in your builds, same here! I use Copaslip, but instead of an LM style grease, have you considered using a bearing grease instead? I find it is a bit smoother in the ball races. Worth thinking about.

    Best wishes,

    Ben Stride

    1. Hi Ben
      Thanks for your comment. The 531c Race frames are really nice frames. I was recently tempted by a 653 Moderne from the same era.

      The grease I use has never let me down. I’ve used all sorts in the past from general water proof grease to the actual Campagnolo special grease and Dura-Ace grease. I find they all do the same job but at varying expense, typically the more expensive the grease, the smaller the tub/tube you get.

      We would get huge tubs of bearing grease in the bike workshop and it was ok but I’ve used the LM grease on my own bikes for about 30 years now and have just recently used the LM grease again on SB3800 to fit a Nuovo Record BB and Super Record headset and they are super smooth, and I know it will last, stay in place and still be in great shape when I service the bike next year.

      Cheers
      Neil

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s